TOUR OPTIONS

If you are interested in a tour during your stay in Ireland, tour bookings can be made directly through the event partner Abbey Conference & Events. Please have a look through the suggested options below and send any enquiries to lacrosse2020@abbey.ie 

SUGGESTED PROGRAMME 

 

BURREN DAYTRIP

 

Today meet your coach and guide or driver/guide at your accommodation and transfer to the Burren.

 

Upon arrival, enjoy a tour of The Burren

The Burren landscape covers over 150 square kilometres and is one of Ireland’s 6 National Parks.

The region is visually similar to a moonscape, yet shelters a mixture of flora and archaeological

sites which have attracted visitors for centuries. Man came here over 6000 years ago, cleared the

forests and set in motion soil erosion. Centuries of weathering has produced a terrain of fissured

limestone pavements, disappearing lakes, terraced mountains, and underground cave systems.

For millennia man has left his mark, megalithic tombs and cooking sites litter the pavements, while medieval towerhouses and churches guard the valleys. Today man is absent from most of the upland, leaving behind ancient field systems, routeways and placenames. Today’s visitors to the Burren will find Arctic, Alpine and Mediterranean plants growing together.

 

Continue on and visit Cliffs of Moher

Situated on the Atlantic Ocean and bordering the Burren region, the Cliffs of Moher are one

of Ireland's most spectacular sights. Standing 230 metres above the ground at their highest

point and 8km long, the Cliffs boast one of the most amazing views in Ireland. On a clear day,

the Aran Islands are visible in Galway Bay as well as the valleys and hills of Connemara. The

cliffs reach their highest point just north of O' Brien's Tower built by Cornelius O’ Brien, a

descendant of Brian Boru, to entertain his lady friends. A visit of the tower is also possible.

The sweeping view across the Atlantic has recently been ranked the best 'cliff-view' on the planet by Conde Nast Traveler. The respected travel publication has voted the world-famous landmark at the top of a new chart of ' Nine Gorgeous Cliff Views That Rival The Grand Canyon'.

 

Enjoy a visit and a sheepdog demonstration at Caherconnell Stone Fort

Caherconnell Stone Fort, situated 1km south of Poulnabrone Dolmen in the heart of the Burren, offers visitors the opportunity to visit an exceptionally well-preserved example of the stone forts and ringforts existing within the Burren. The fort is in its original state. Its position overlooking virtually all surrounding areas suggests a defensive settlement. This may not have been defensive in a military sense but rather for personal security from raiders or wild animals which were among the most common foes at the time. Ringforts such as Caherconnell are thought to have been inhabited from 400-1200 AD.

 

Return to your accommodation.

 

Overnight at your accommodation.

 

DINGLE PENINSULA DAYTRIP

 

This morning meet your coach and guide or your driver/guide at your accommodation and transfer to the Dingle Peninsula

Today you will explore the Dingle Peninsula. Some of the finest coastal scenery to be seen in Ireland can be found in West Kerry, on the Dingle Peninsula, the most northern of the Kerry Peninsulas. This peninsula is famous for its Celtic, pre-Christian monuments and Christian churches. It is also a ‘Gaeltacht' (Irish speaking) area, where the Irish language and traditional ways of life are preserved.  Dingle town itself is a thriving fishing town and offers plenty of opportunity for shopping or simply savouring the atmosphere of a typical country Irish town with its plentiful pubs, narrow streets and busy harbour.  The road around the Peninsula is truly spectacular. It passes through a chain of Mountains, called Slieve Mish. From Inch, a long beach bordered by dunes and made famous by David Lean’s movie “Ryan’s daughter,” admire the Iveragh Peninsula and Rossbeigh Beach. From Dingle, drive around the coast to Slea Head. Here the blue of the marine landscape surrounds the Blasket Islands, deserted since 1953. In the distance are the two rocky Skellig islands, where the ruins of an early Christian Monastery can be found. The Dingle Peninsula will charm you with its villages painted in bright colours and will bewitch you with the dramatic beauty of its landscapes.

 

Visit the Gallarus Oratory

Gallarus Oratory is the most impressive early Christian monument on the Dingle peninsula. It has withstood the passage of time for over 1200 years. Built in the shape of an upturned boat, the oratory formed part of a larger monastic site and was used as a place of prayer and reflection.  With its small entrance doorway and round-headed east-facing window, it is an excellent example of dry stone construction. Gallarus Oratory visitor centre offers visitors the opportunity to explore Gallarus Oratory and also see a Audio Visual presentation on the surrounding area. There is a shop offering souvenirs and some refreshments located in the main centre.

 

Enjoy free time in Dingle Town under own arrangements.

 

Return to your accommodation.

 

GALWAY DAYTRIP

 

Today, meet your coach and guide or your driver/guide at your accommodation and transfer to Galway City.

 

Upon arrival, enjoy a walking city tour of Galway

The city centre of Galway is mainly pedestrian, so a walking tour is the best way to enjoy its atmosphere and discover some of its most important monument. The tour starts on Eyre Square and finishes at the Claddagh. During the tour you will see Lynch Castle, home to the mayors of Galway, Saint Nicholas Church founded in the 13th century, and the famous Spanish Arch. You can walk along the Corrib River to the Claddagh village or to the majestic Cathedral.

 

Then enjoy Lough Corrib cruise with Irish coffee demonstration

The Corrib Princess sails from Woodquay in the heart of Galway city, along the famous Steamers Line, which is the lakes traditional trade route. The journey takes passengers along the majestic River Corrib and onto the lake providing visitors with a guided commentary in a number of languages on the historic monuments and natural amenities  on this waterway that leads to the largest lake in the Republic of Ireland. There is an abundance of wild life and the Corrib has a peace and tranquillity all of its own. The normal sightseeing tour is 90 minutes in duration with indoor seating for guests and tea/coffee plus traditional scones are included during the cruise. Irish coffee demonstrations can be organized during the cruise. Evening dinner and entertainment cruise options are also available.

 

Spend some free time under own arrangements before returning to your accommodation.

 

 

ARAN ISLAND DAYTRIP

 

This morning, meet your coach and guide or your driver/guide at your accommodation and transfer to Doolin to catch the ferry to Inishmore

 

Enjoy a minibus tour of the Aran Islands with farm visit

The three Aran Islands of Inis Mór (Big Island), Inis Meáin (Middle Island) and Inis Oírr (East Island) are located off the west coast of Ireland, at the mouth of Galway Bay. The Aran Islands are famous for their geological formation, historical monuments and linguistic cultural heritage. The Irish (Gealic) language is spoken here as the first language (English is also spoken).The stunning scenery, thousands of miles of stone walls, peaceful atmosphere and friendly people make the islands a special place to visit.

 

Visit Dun Aengus Fort

Perched spectacularly on a cliff overlooking the Atlantic ocean, this is the largest of the prehistoric stone forts of the Aran Islands. It is enclosed by three massive dry-stone walls and a "chevaux-de-frise" consisting of tall blocks of limestone set vertically into the ground to deter attackers. The fort is about 900m from the Visitor Centre and is approached over rising ground. There is access for visitors with disabilities to the Visitor Centre but the route to the fort is over rough terrain in parts that is not suitable for wheelchairs. The small visitor centre contains some displays on the history and geology of the area.

 

Spend some free time on the island.

 

Return ferry from Inishmore and coach transfer back to your accommodation.

 

 

TIPPERARY DAYTRIP

 

Today, meet your coach and guide or your driver/guide at your accommodation and visit Rock of Cashel. 

Possibly the most photographed site in Ireland, the Rock of Cashel towers over the town of Cashel from its perch on a 200-foot high outcrop of limestone. Once the seat of the Kings of Munster. St. Patrick visited the rock in 450 AD, while Brian Boru was crowned the first high King of Ireland here in the tenth century. Granted to the church in the twelfth century, by the O'Brien clan, today the impressive stone walls enclose a round tower, a cathedral, a twelfth century Romanesque chapel and high crosses. The Vicars Choral has been recently restored and its basement houses a small museum of artefacts found on the site. One of the leading visitor attractions in Ireland, in 2011 it was visited by Queen Elizabeth II on her historic first visit to the Republic of Ireland.

 

After, visit Cahir Castle

Superbly set on a rocky island in the River Suir in Cahir town, County Tipperary, this impressive 15th century castle - the largest of its period in Ireland - was considered impregnable until the advent of heavy cannon. Once the stronghold of the powerful Butler family, the castle retains its keep, tower and much of its original defensive structure. The origins of the castle are traced back to the third century when a Dun (earthen fort) was built upon the rocky island. This gave the town of Cahir its original name "Dun Iascaigh" (town of the fish fort). There is an audio-visual presentation, and guided tours are also available to help fully understand the history of Cahir, its town, its castle and the surrounding area.

 

Return to your accommodation.

 

 

BUNRATTY CASTLE EVENING

 

This evening transfer to Bunratty Castle or similar and enjoy a medieval banquet and entertainment

Bunratty Castle is one of the most complete and authentic medieval castles in Ireland. Built in 1425 and plundered on many occasions, it was authentically restored in 1954 to its former medieval splendour and now contains mainly 15th and 16th century furnishings and tapestries capturing the mood and the style of the times. For over 40 years the ladies of the Castle, aided and abetted by the Earl's Butler, have welcomed guests from all over the world to join them at The Earl's Banquet. The evening begins with a mead reception in the Great Hall of the castle, then downstairs to enjoy a four course meal with red & white wine. This is followed by entertainment by the world renowned Bunratty Castle Entertainers accompanied by harp and violin. The banquet is held twice nightly during the high season.

 

Return transfer to your accommodation.

 

DUBLIN PRE TOUR

 

Day 1: Dublin

 

Today, meet your coach and guide or your driver/guide at Dublin airport and transfer to city centre.

 

Upon arrival, enjoy a Panoramic Dublin City Tour

Enjoy a panoramic tour of Dublin City. Here you will discover the north and south side of the River Liffey. This area offers great striking monuments such as the GPO (General Post Office) on the city main thoroughfare, O'Connell Street, or the Custom House along the quays, as well as the Phoenix Park, the largest public park in Europe. The south side appears more sophisticated with its vast Georgian squares, such as Merrion Square, where Oscar Wilde’s House can still be found (today owned by an American College), its colourful doors, along with Grafton Street and its quality shops. Not so far from St. Stephen’s Green, in Kildare St., you will see the house of Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula. This part of the city is also dominated by the students of Trinity College, where the famous book of Kells  is permanently exhibited in its library. The university is facing the medieval district where Dublin Castle and the two Anglican Cathedrals can be found.

 

After, visit Trinity College

Trinity was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1st on grounds confiscated from an Augustinian priory and is the oldest university in Ireland. The Campanile, erected in 1852, was built on what is believed to be the centre of the monastery. Built to further the education of the ruling Anglo-Irish families, restrictions were imposed to prevent Catholic from attending courses. These restrictions were not fully lifted until the 1970’s. Trinity however admitted women in 1902, earlier than most British universities. Most of the main buildings off the main square were built during the Georgian period, some of which replaced older buildings. Within its walls, visitors will be able to admire Parliament Square and its 18th Century edifices. Trinity College has had many famous students such as Jonathan Swift and Samuel Beckett who later became a lecturer in French at the university. The inter-denominational Church is very much worth a visit.

 

Transfer to your accommodation in Dublin to check in.

 

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Dublin.

 

Day 2: Experience Gaelic Games

 

This morning, enjoy a session of Experience Gaelic Games

With Experience Gaelic Games, visitors take part in a unique and integral part of Irish culture and heritage, such as traditional Gaelic games and dances. The experience is brought alive by a team of passionate ambassadors/coaches. Visitors can learn the games, and operators will coach and instruct them in the skills, then let them play mini-matches, take part in team building activities or sit back and watch. A state of the art visitor centre was opened in Glasnevin in September 2014.

 

Enjoy free time under own arrangements.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Dublin.

 

Day 3: Wicklow Mountains & Glendalough Visitors Centre

 

This morning, explore Wicklow Mountains National Park

Wicklow Mountains National Park covers much of upland Wicklow, and contains an area of nearly 20,000 hectares. The National Park provides protection for landscapes and wildlife. Important habitats include native woodland, such as the oakwoods at Glendalough, and large areas of blanket bog, including the Lugnaquila and Liffey Head Bog complexes. The Information Office for the National Park, and the Education Centre are both located in Glendalough near the Upper Lake. The Education Centre focuses on nature awareness, conservation, and ecology. The National Park is a protected area and visitors are urged to follow Leave No Trace principles.

 

After, visit Glendalough Visitors Centre

This early Christian monastic site was founded by St. Kevin in the 6th century. Set in a glaciated valley with two lakes, the monastic remains include a superb round tower, stone churches and decorated crosses. The Visitor Centre has an interesting exhibition on Glendalough detailing the history, archaeology and wildlife of this area of Wicklow and includes an audio-visual show . French, Italian and Spanish guided tours are available all year by advance booking. While the visitor centre is fully accessible for visitors with disabilities, access to the monastic site is very difficult for wheelchair users.

 

This evening enjoy dinner and entertainment at Merry Ploughboy Irish Music Pub

The Merry Ploughboys live in concert is widely regarded as the best traditional music show in Dublin and also as a must see for any visitors to Dublin city. The show is a highly entertaining performance of live traditional Irish music, song and Irish dancing. From start to finish, this is a show based on fantastic interaction between the performers and the audience.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Dublin.

 

Day 4: Rock of Cashel

 

Today, transfer to your accommodation in Limerick.

 

En-route visit Rock of Cashel

Possibly the most photographed site in Ireland, the Rock of Cashel towers over the town of Cashel from its perch on a 200-foot high outcrop of limestone. Once the seat of the Kings of Munster. St. Patrick visited the rock in 450 AD, while Brian Boru was crowned the first high King of Ireland here in the tenth century. Granted to the church in the twelfth century, by the O'Brien clan, today the impressive stone walls enclose a round tower, a cathedral, a twelfth century Romanesque chapel and high crosses. The Vicars Choral has been recently restored and its basement houses a small museum of artefacts found on the site. One of the leading visitor attractions in Ireland, in 2011 it was visited by Queen Elizabeth II on her historic first visit to the Republic of Ireland.

 

 

 

SOUTHWEST POST -TOUR

 

Day 1: Killarney

 

Today, meet your coach and guide or your driver/guide at your accommodation and transfer to Killarney.

 

On arrival in Killarney, enjoy a Jaunting Car Experience in Killarney National Park

Killarney National Park became Ireland's first National Park in 1932 when the Muckross Estate was presented to the Nation by Senator Arthur Vincent the owner of Muckross house. Situated in South-west Ireland, close to the most westerly point in Europe, the National Park covers over 10,000 hectares of mountain, moorland, woodland, waterways, parks and gardens. A major geological boundary occurs within the Park, and this, in combination with the climatic influence of the Gulf Stream and the wide range of altitudes in the Park, gives rise to an unusual and varied ecology. Step aboard a jaunting car and discover areas of the National Park that you might not otherwise visit.  Relax aboard a jaunting car as your Jarvey (driver) takes you through the magnificent scenery of Killarney National Park.

 

Check in to your hotel.

 

Enjoy your dinner at your accommodation in Killarney.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Killarney.

 

Day 2: Ring Of Kerry

 

This morning after breakfast, enjoy a full day touring the Ring of Kerry

The Ring of Kerry (166km) is the most famous and panoramic route in Ireland.  The astonishing beauty of this large peninsula, Iveragh, comes from the great diversity of its scenery, which offers incessant contrasts. En route around the Ring, take in spectacular scenery - mountains, peat bogs, lakes and magnificent views of the Atlantic Ocean as one travels along the coast road. Leaving Killarney pass through Killorglin, famous for its Puck Fair, then to Glenbeigh where the cliff road affords panoramic views of the Dingle Peninsula and Dingle Bay. Continuing to Cahirciveen, you’ll pass the birthplace of our National hero, Daniel O’Connell. Next, continue on through peat bogs to the town of Waterville. Continue to Sneem Village, famous for its brightly coloured houses. The road then continues through the mountains to Molls Gap and Ladies View with superb views of the famous Lakes of Killarney.

 

After, visit Skellig Experience

The Skellig Experience is a heritage centre dedicated to life on the Skellig islands and was developed by Cork Kerry Tourism in 1992 to make the four treasures of the off shore Skellig Islands more easily understood by all. The Skellig Islands are found 12km off the coast of Kerry. The larger island, Skellig Michael, an UNESCO World Heritage site, was a monastic site occupied from the 6th until the 12th century. The second Island is renowned as a bird sanctuary and houses a colony of 20,000 pairs of breeding gannets, the second largest breeding colony in the world. The exhibition building is a purpose built visitor centre designed to be rugged in feeling and finishes, to reflect the experience which will be undertaken by visitors. The use of concrete vaults with grass topping is designed to echo the wild quality of the south west of Ireland and to blend in with the surrounding hills.

 

This evening enjoy dinner and entertainment at Kate Kearneys Cottage or similar

Nestled at the entrance to the world famous Gap of Dunloe, Kate Kearney's Cottage is a 150 year old family-run establishment. Kate Kearney's Cottage hosts a traditional Irish night which consists of dinner, traditional music and costumed dancers. The night is presented for groups either in the restaurant or specially customised 'barn'.

 

 Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Killarney.

 

Day 3: Killarney to Cork

 

Today, depart Killarney and journey to Cork.

 

En-route visit Blarney Castle

Attracting visitors from all over the world, Blarney Castle is situated in Blarney village, 8 km from Cork city. An ancient stronghold of the McCarthy's, Lords of Muskerry, it is one of Ireland's oldest and most historic castles, and one of the strongest fortresses in Munster.  Built in 1446, Blarney Castle is famous for its Blarney stone, the Stone of Eloquence, which is traditionally believed to have the power to bestow the gift of eloquence on all those who kiss it. Many legends tell the story of the Stone, but why not kiss it and find out the truth behind the legend. The Castle gardens covering 60 acres of land are under constant change and over the past few years, a water garden, fern garden and poison garden have been developed and are all open to visitors.

 

 

 

 

After, visit Blarney Woollen Mills

Originally established in 1823, Blarney Woollen Mills now houses a large selection of Irish products. With a wide selection of sweaters and woollens, crystal and china, gifts and souvenirs for all the family, this famous store has something for everyone. With five locations across Ireland, Blarney Woollen Mills offers an essential Irish shopping experience.

 

Check in to your accommodation in Cork.

 

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Cork.

 

Day 4: Jameson Distillery Midleton

 

Today, visit Jameson Distillery Midleton

Whiskey has been distilled in the town of Midleton, County Cork since the early 9th Century. The Jameson Distillery Midleton was founded by the Murphy brothers in 1825. The 45 minute guided tour of the distillery commences with a short audio-visual, after which visitors are taken on a tour of the old distillery by local guides. Follow the old distillery trail through mills, maltings, stillhouse, warehouses and kilns and view the largest pot still in the world - some of these buildings date back to 1795. The tour ends in the Distillery pub, where all are invited to enjoy a glass of Irish Whiskey. During the visit a number of volunteers are selected to take part in a tasting session to compare a Jameson whiskey with a Scottish Whisky and American bourbon. Participants will receive a diploma for their achievement!  It is possible for the whole group to participate in the whiskey comparison tasting. The visitor attraction has a Malt House Restaurant and a shop where guests can buy a range of whiskeys and souvenirs. 

 

Transfer to your accommodation in the Dublin Airport area or Shannon Airport area.

 

Enjoy your dinner at your accommodation.

 

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your accommodation near Airport or area.

 

Day 5: Farewell

 

Today transfer to Dublin Airport or Shannon Airport.

 

 

 

 

NORTHERN IRELAND PRE TOUR

 

Day 1: Dublin

 

Today, transfer from Dublin Airport to the city centre.

 

Upon arrival, enjoy Panoramic Dublin City Tour

Enjoy a panoramic tour of Dublin City. Here you will discover the north and south side of the River Liffey. This area offers great striking monuments such as the GPO (General Post Office) on the city main thoroughfare, O'Connell Street, or the Custom House along the quays, as well as the Phoenix Park, the largest public park in Europe. The south side appears more sophisticated with its vast Georgian squares, such as Merrion Square, where Oscar Wilde’s House can still be found (today owned by an American College), its colourful doors, along with Grafton Street and its quality shops. Not so far from St. Stephen’s Green, in Kildare St., you will see the house of Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula. This part of the city is also dominated by the students of Trinity College, where the famous book of Kells is permanently exhibited in its library. The university is facing the medieval district where Dublin Castle and the two Anglican Cathedrals can be found.

 

After, visit Trinity College

Trinity was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1st on grounds confiscated from an Augustinian priory and is the oldest university in Ireland. The Campanile, erected in 1852, was built on what is believed to be the centre of the monastery. Built to further the education of the ruling Anglo-Irish families, restrictions were imposed to prevent Catholic from attending courses. These restrictions were not fully lifted until the 1970’s. Trinity however admitted women in 1902, earlier than most British universities. Most of the main buildings off the main square were built during the Georgian period, some of which replaced older buildings. Within its walls, visitors will be able to admire Parliament Square and its 18th Century edifices. Trinity College has had many famous students such as Jonathan Swift and Samuel Beckett who later became a lecturer in French at the university. The inter-denominational Church is very much worth a visit.

 

Check in to your accommodation.

 

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Dublin.

 

Day 2: Experience Gaelic Games & Merry Ploughboy Irish Music Pub

 

This day experience Gaelic Games

With Experience Gaelic Games, visitors take part in a unique and integral part of Irish culture and heritage, such as traditional Gaelic games and dances. The experience is brought alive by a team of passionate ambassadors/coaches. Visitors can learn the games, and operators will coach and instruct them in the skills, then let them play mini-matches, take part in team building activities or sit back and watch. A state of the art visitor centre was opened in Glasnevin in September 2014.

 

Enjoy some free time under own arrangements.

 

This evening enjoy dinner and entertainment at Merry Ploughboy Irish Music Pub or similar

The Merry Ploughboys live in concert is widely regarded as the best traditional music show in Dublin and also as a must see for any visitors to Dublin city. The show is a highly entertaining performance of live traditional Irish music, song and Irish dancing. From start to finish, this is a show based on fantastic interaction between the performers and the audience.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Dublin.

 

Day 3: Dublin to Belfast

 

Today, depart Dublin and journey to Belfast.

 

Upon arrival, enjoy Panoramic Belfast City Tour

A guided city tour is an excellent way to discover Belfast City.  The tour will take in the leaning Albert Memorial Clock tower (Irelands answer to the Tower of Pisa) and the Opera House, which is one of Belfast’s great landmarks. Your tour will pass by the City Hall, the Opera house, The Crown Bar (dates from 1885), Queens University and the Botanic Gardens.  Some tours will take in a visit to the Harland and Wolfe Shipyard, where the Titanic was built and launched in 1912.  A visit to the Shankill and Falls road will be of interest as it will give the visitor an indication of how life was in Belfast during the troubles.

 

After, visit Titanic Belfast

Located in the heart of Belfast, the Titanic Belfast recreates the story of the world’s most famous ship in an iconic, six floor building right beside the historic site of the original ship’s construction. Opened in April 2012 to coincide with the centenary of its launch, the self-guided journey begins on entering the building's giant atrium, where the visitor is surrounded by the four ‘ship’s hull’ shaped wings which house the Titanic Experience. As you journey through the nine large galleries of the interactive exhibition, you will uncover the true story of the Titanic, from her conception in Belfast in the early 1900's, through her construction and launch, to her famous maiden voyage and subsequent place in history.

 

Check in to your accommodation.

 

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Belfast.

 

Day 4: Giant’s Causeway

 

Today, visit the Giants Causeway Visitor Centre

Encounter Northern Ireland’s favourite giant Finn McCool at the new Giants Causeway Visitor centre on the North Antrim coast which opened in the summer of 2012. According to legend Finn McCool created the Giants Causeway by building stepping stones to Scotland to challenge the Scottish giant Benandonner! The new Visitor centre explores the major themes of mythology, geology, landscape, ecology, culture and social history based on the UNESCO World Heritage site that consists of 40,000 basalt polygonal columns formed 60 million years ago after a volcanic eruption. There are various interactive exhibits and short video presentations within five designated interpretive exhibition areas and the self guided visit will culminate with a spectacular two minutes audio-visual projection of a volcanic eruption flowing over the walls and onto the floor. Other services and facilities include a large craft and souvenir shop, Tourist Information and restaurant.

To enhance the wider visitor experience around the site, a hand held audio guide is available in a range of languages which will bring the wider World Heritage Site to life and inform visitors of unique features to look out for across this amazing landscape. Guided tours of the site are also available. The walks and trails around the World Heritage Site have been upgraded, with the addition of a new accessible cliff top walk for families and people with disabilities. In 2015, Conde Nast Traveler magazine included hopping the stones of the Giant's Causeway as one of the '50 things to do in Europe before you die'.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Belfast.

 

Day 5: Belfast to Donegal

 

This day, depart Belfast and journey to Donegal.

 

En-route enjoy a Panoramic Derry City Tour

Founded in the 6th century by St Columba, Derry is the second largest city and port of Northern Ireland.  Columba named it “Doire” or “Oak grove” which was later anglicised as Derry. In 1613 the city was selected as a major plantation project, organised by the London livery companies and as a result it acquired the prefix London. In the same year the walls of Derry were built to protect the town from the Gaelic chieftains in Donegal. A walk on the walls is a must on any visit to Derry as they are among the best-preserved fortifications in Europe. Rising to a height of 8m they are 9m wide in some areas.  Today these walls separate two communities, the Bogside ~ a Catholic getto with its famous murals and the Waterside ~ a Protestant enclave

 

After, visit the Guildhall

The Guildhall is a beautiful building and is well worth taking time to see. It is located in the heart of the city, just outside the city walls and close to the Peace Bridge. Fashioned in neo-gothic style, the Guildhall is one of the most striking buildings in the North West and was originally built in 1887 by The Honourable The Irish Society. The red sandstone building is of neo-gothic architecture, with Tudor overtones. The Guildhall contains stunning examples of stained glass windows and visitors will be intrigued by its unique history and appeal. The staircase, main hall organ and corridors give a fascinating insight into this distinctive building.

 

Check in to your accommodation.

 

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Donegal.

 

Day 6: Donegal to Galway

 

Today depart Donegal and journey to Galway.

 

En-route enjoy a sheepdog demonstration at Atlantic Sheepdogs

Atlantic Sheepdogs is located close to the village of Grange in County Sligo, with the farm overlooking Streedagh beach to the west and shadowed by Benbulben mountain to the east. Visitors are offered a chance to experience life on an Irish sheep farm. The owner's passion is his trusty sheepdogs and he spends time demonstrating the skill of sheep-herding with the sheepdogs. The owner and his dogs have competed at sheepdog trials both nationally and internationally for twenty years, representing Ireland on numerous occasions. 

 

On arrival enjoy from time in Galway City.

 

Check in to your accommodation.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Galway.

 

Day 7: Connemara & Kylemore Abbey

 

This morning, depart for a Connemara Day Tour

Today you will explore the Connemara Region. Connemara is a land of lakes and rivers, bogs and mountains. A land of small villages where Gaelic is still the spoken language and where little has changed since the beginning of time. It is without a doubt the wildest and the most romantic part of Ireland. Connemara is a vast peninsula bordered by the arid and rocky coastline of Galway Bay in the south ~ a land characteristic for its stone walls and thatched cottages.  On its northern shore the land is harsher and more secret, with spectacular views of the Ocean and the beautiful fjord of Killary Harbour, as well as the steep mountains overlooking numerous lakes and large bog areas. Connemara is a real paradise for Nature lovers and those in search of strong emotions. In 1951, John Ford's great movie "The Quiet Man" starring John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara and Barry Fitzgerald was made, and filming was centred in the village of Cong on the Mayo-Galway border.

 

Visit Kylemore Abbey

Kylemore Abbey is stunningly located in the Kylemore Pass in Connemara. Mitchell Henry built the House in 1868, after having spent his honeymoon in the area.  The architecture is best described

as neo-gothic and the house still displays all the characteristics of that period. One of Kylemore Abbey's most famous features is its miniature cathedral, built in 1870 and known locally as the Gothic church. Today, the abbey is home to the Irish order of Benedictine nuns. They established a private school for young girls, which was the renowned Kylemore Abbey International School. The school eventually closed in 2010. Facilities at Kylemore include a visitor centre, an exhibition housed in the main reception rooms of the house and a video which takes the visitor through the history of the house and its occupants. The Gothic church is available to visit and as a venue for choir groups to sing in. If time allows guests can also visit the Kylemore Abbey Victorian Walled Garden was laid out in 1867 and took three years to complete. A bus service provided from the

front door of the Abbey directly to the garden and is the only permitted means of access.

 

Enjoy your dinner at a local restaurant.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Galway.

 

Day 8: Galway to Limerick

 

Today, you will depart Galway and journey to Limerick.

 

En-route, visit Cliffs of Moher

Situated on the Atlantic Ocean and bordering the Burren region, the Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland's most spectacular sights. Standing 230 metres above the ground at their highest point and 8km long, the Cliffs boast one of the most amazing views in Ireland. On a clear day, the Aran Islands are visible in Galway Bay as well as the valleys and hills of Connemara. The cliffs reach their highest point just north of O' Brien's Tower built by Cornelius O’ Brien, a descendant of Brian Boru, to entertain his lady friends. A visit of the tower is also possible. The sweeping view across the Atlantic has recently been ranked the best 'cliff-view' on the planet by Conde Nast Traveler. The respected travel publication has voted the world-famous landmark at the top of a new chart of ' Nine Gorgeous Cliff Views That Rival The Grand Canyon'.

 

Enjoy a drive through The Burren

The Burren landscape covers over 150 square kilometres and is one of Ireland’s 6 National Parks. The region is visually similar to a moonscape, yet shelters a mixture of flora and archaeological sites which have attracted visitors for centuries. Man came here over 6000 years ago, cleared the forests and set in motion soil erosion. Centuries of weathering has produced a terrain of fissured limestone pavements, disappearing lakes, terraced mountains, and underground cave systems. For millennia man has left his mark, megalithic tombs and cooking sites litter the pavements, while medieval towerhouses and churches guard the valleys. Today man is absent from most of the upland, leaving behind ancient field systems, routeways and placenames. Today’s visitors to the Burren will find Arctic, Alpine and Mediterranean plants growing together.

 

 

 

 

NORTHERN IRELAND POST TOUR

 

Day 1: Limerick to Galway

 

Today, you will depart Limerick and journey to Galway.

 

En-route enjoy a drive through The Burren

The Burren landscape covers over 150 square kilometres and is one of Ireland’s 6 National Parks. The region is visually similar to a moonscape, yet shelters a mixture of flora and archaeological

sites which have attracted visitors for centuries. Man came here over 6000 years ago, cleared the forests and set in motion soil erosion. Centuries of weathering has produced a terrain of fissured limestone pavements, disappearing lakes, terraced mountains, and underground cave systems.

For millennia man has left his mark, megalithic tombs and cooking sites litter the pavements, while medieval towerhouses and churches guard the valleys. Today man is absent from most of the upland, leaving behind ancient field systems, routeways and placenames. Today’s visitors to the Burren will find Arctic, Alpine and Mediterranean plants growing together.

 

Visit Cliffs of Moher

Situated on the Atlantic Ocean and bordering the Burren region, the Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland's most spectacular sights. Standing 230 metres above the ground at their highest point and 8km long, the Cliffs boast one of the most amazing views in Ireland. On a clear day, the Aran Islands are visible in Galway Bay as well as the valleys and hills of Connemara. The cliffs reach their highest point just north of O' Brien's Tower built by Cornelius O’ Brien, a descendant of Brian Boru, to entertain his lady friends. A visit of the tower is also possible. The sweeping view  across the Atlantic has recently been ranked the best 'cliff-view' on the planet by Conde Nast Traveler. The respected travel publication has voted the world-famous landmark at the top of a new chart of ' Nine Gorgeous Cliff Views That Rival The Grand Canyon'.

 

Check in to your accommodation.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Galway.

 

Day 2: Connemara & Kylemore Abbey

 

This morning, depart for a Connemara Day Tour

Today you will explore the Connemara Region. Connemara is a land of lakes and rivers, bogs and mountains. A land of small villages where Gaelic is still the spoken language and where little has changed since the beginning of time. It is without a doubt the wildest and the most romantic part of Ireland. Connemara is a vast peninsula bordered by the arid and rocky coastline of Galway Bay in the south ~ a land characteristic for its stone walls and thatched cottages.  On its northern shore the land is harsher and more secret, with spectacular views of the Ocean and the beautiful fjord of Killary Harbour, as well as the steep mountains overlooking numerous lakes and large bog areas. Connemara is a real paradise for Nature lovers and those in search of strong emotions. In 1951, John Ford's great movie "The Quiet Man" starring John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara and Barry Fitzgerald was made, and filming was centred in the village of Cong on the Mayo-Galway border.

 

Visit Kylemore Abbey

Kylemore Abbey is stunningly located in the Kylemore Pass in Connemara. Mitchell Henry built the House in 1868, after having spent his honeymoon in the area.  The architecture is best described

as neo-gothic and the house still displays all the characteristics of that period. One of Kylemore Abbey's most famous features is its miniature cathedral, built in 1870 and known locally as the Gothic church. Today, the abbey is home to the Irish order of Benedictine nuns. They established a private school for young girls, which was the renowned Kylemore Abbey International School. The school eventually closed in 2010. Facilities at Kylemore include a visitor centre, an exhibition housed in the main reception rooms of the house and a video which takes the visitor through the history of the house and its occupants. The Gothic church is available to visit and as a venue for choir groups to sing in. If time allows guests can also visit the Kylemore Abbey Victorian Walled Garden was laid out in 1867 and took three years to complete. A bus service provided from the

front door of the Abbey directly to the garden and is the only permitted means of access.

 

Enjoy your dinner at a local restaurant.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Galway.

 

Day 3: Galway to Donegal

 

Today depart Galway to Derry.

 

En-route enjoy a sheepdog demonstration and Atlantic Sheepdogs

Atlantic Sheepdogs is located close to the village of Grange in County Sligo, with the farm overlooking Streedagh beach to the west and shadowed by Benbulben mountain to the east. Visitors are offered a chance to experience life on an Irish sheep farm. The owner's passion is his trusty sheepdogs and he spends time demonstrating the skill of sheep-herding with the sheepdogs. The owner and his dogs have competed at sheepdog trials both nationally and internationally for twenty years, representing Ireland on numerous occasions. 

 

Check in to your accommodation.

 

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Derry.

 

Day 4: Donegal to Belfast

 

En-route enjoy a Panoramic Derry City Tour

Founded in the 6th century by St Columba, Derry is the second largest city and port of Northern Ireland.  Columba named it “Doire” or “Oak grove” which was later anglicised as Derry. In 1613 the city was selected as a major plantation project, organised by the London livery companies and as a result it acquired the prefix London. In the same year the walls of Derry were built to protect the town from the Gaelic chieftains in Donegal. A walk on the walls is a must on any visit to Derry as they are among the best-preserved fortifications in Europe. Rising to a height of 8m they are 9m wide in some areas.  Today these walls separate two communities, the Bogside ~ a Catholic getto with its famous murals and the Waterside ~ a Protestant enclave

 

After, visit the Guildhall

The Guildhall is a beautiful building and is well worth taking time to see. It is located in the heart of the city, just outside the city walls and close to the Peace Bridge. Fashioned in neo-gothic style, the Guildhall is one of the most striking buildings in the North West and was originally built in 1887 by The Honourable The Irish Society. The red sandstone building is of neo-gothic architecture, with Tudor overtones. The Guildhall contains stunning examples of stained glass windows and visitors will be intrigued by its unique history and appeal. The staircase, main hall organ and corridors give a fascinating insight into this distinctive building.

 

Check in to your accommodation.

 

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Derry.

 

Day 5: Giant’s Causeway

 

Today, depart Derry and journey to Belfast.

 

En-route visit Giants Causeway Visitor Centre

Encounter Northern Ireland’s favourite giant Finn McCool at the new Giants Causeway Visitor centre on the North Antrim coast which opened in the summer of 2012. According to legend Finn McCool created the Giants Causeway by building stepping stones to Scotland to challenge the Scottish giant Benandonner! The new Visitor centre explores the major themes of mythology, geology, landscape, ecology, culture and social history based on the UNESCO World Heritage site that consists of 40,000 basalt polygonal columns formed 60 million years ago after a volcanic eruption. There are various interactive exhibits and short video presentations within five designated interpretive exhibition areas and the self guided visit will culminate with a spectacular two minutes audio-visual projection of a volcanic eruption flowing over the walls and onto the floor. Other services and facilities include a large craft and souvenir shop, Tourist Information and restaurant. To enhance the wider visitor experience around the site, a hand held audio guide is available in a range of languages which will bring the wider World Heritage Site to life and inform visitors of unique features to look out for across this amazing landscape. Guided tours of the site are also available. The walks and trails around the World Heritage Site have been upgraded, with the addition of a new accessible cliff top walk for families and people with disabilities. In 2015, Conde Nast Traveler magazine included hopping the stones of the Giant's Causeway as one of the '50 things to do in Europe before you die'.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Belfast.

 

Day 6: Belfast to Dublin

 

Today, enjoy Panoramic Belfast City Tour

A guided city tour is an excellent way to discover Belfast City.  The tour will take in the leaning Albert Memorial Clock tower (Irelands answer to the Tower of Pisa) and the Opera House, which is one of Belfast’s great landmarks. Your tour will pass by the City Hall, the Opera house, The Crown Bar (dates from 1885), Queens University and the Botanic Gardens.  Some tours will take in a visit to the Harland and Wolfe Shipyard, where the Titanic was built and launched in 1912.  A visit to the Shankill and Falls road will be of interest as it will give the visitor an indication of how life was in Belfast during the troubles.

 

Visit Titanic Belfast

Located in the heart of Belfast, the Titanic Belfast recreates the story of the world’s most famous ship in an iconic, six floor building right beside the historic site of the original ship’s construction. Opened in April 2012 to coincide with the centenary of its launch, the self-guided journey begins

on entering the building's giant atrium, where the visitor is surrounded by the four ‘ship’s hull’ shaped wings which house the Titanic Experience. As you journey through the nine large galleries of the interactive exhibition, you will uncover the true story of the Titanic, from her conception in Belfast in the early 1900's, through her construction and launch, to her famous maiden voyage and subsequent place in history.

 

After, depart Belfast and journey to Dublin.

 

Check in to your accommodation.

 

Overnight, dinner, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Dublin.

 

Day 7: Experience Gaelic Games & Merry Ploughboy Irish Music Pub

 

Today experience Gaelic Games

With Experience Gaelic Games, visitors take part in a unique and integral part of Irish culture and heritage, such as traditional Gaelic games and dances. The experience is brought alive by a team of passionate ambassadors/coaches. Visitors can learn the games, and operators will coach and instruct them in the skills, then let them play mini-matches, take part in team building activities or sit back and watch. A state of the art visitor centre was opened in Glasnevin in September 2014.

 

Enjoy some free time under own arrangements.

 

Dinner and entertainment at Merry Ploughboy Irish Music Pub or similar

The Merry Ploughboys live in concert is widely regarded as the best traditional music show in Dublin and also as a must see for any visitors to Dublin city. The show is a highly entertaining performance of live traditional Irish music, song and Irish dancing. From start to finish, this is a show based on fantastic interaction between the performers and the audience.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Dublin.

 

Day 8: Dublin

 

Today, enjoy Panoramic Dublin City Tour

Enjoy a panoramic tour of Dublin City. Here you will discover the north and south side of the River Liffey. This area offers great striking monuments such as the GPO (General Post Office) on the city main thoroughfare, O'Connell Street, or the Custom House along the quays, as well as the Phoenix Park, the largest public park in Europe. The south side appears more sophisticated with its vast Georgian squares, such as Merrion Square, where Oscar Wilde’s House can still be found (today owned by an American College), its colourful doors, along with Grafton Street and its quality shops. Not so far from St. Stephen’s Green, in Kildare St., you will see the house of Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula. This part of the city is also dominated by the students of Trinity College, where the famous book of Kells is permanently exhibited in its library. The university is facing the medieval district where Dublin Castle and the two Anglican Cathedrals can be found.

 

Visit Trinity College

Trinity was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1st on grounds confiscated from an Augustinian priory and is the oldest university in Ireland. The Campanile, erected in 1852, was built on what is believed to be the centre of the monastery. Built to further the education of the ruling Anglo-Irish families, restrictions were imposed to prevent Catholic from attending courses. These restrictions were not fully lifted until the 1970’s. Trinity however admitted women in 1902, earlier than most British universities. Most of the main buildings off the main square were built during the Georgian period, some of which replaced older buildings. Within its walls, visitors will be able to admire Parliament Square and its 18th Century edifices. Trinity College has had many famous students such as Jonathan Swift and Samuel Beckett who later became a lecturer in French at the university. The inter-denominational Church is very much worth a visit.

 

Overnight, bed and breakfast at your accommodation in Dublin.

 

Day 9: Farewell

 

This morning,  transfer from Dublin City to Dublin Airport.

© 2016 Ireland Lacrosse

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